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New Year's Eve Champagne and Your Teeth: The Risks

By Joe McIntyre, DDS on December 22, 2017

A champagne toast on New Year's EveThe holiday season is upon us, which means gatherings with friends and family, and eventually a time to ring in the new year. Raising a glass of champagne and offering a toast is traditional for many occasions this time of year. However, something as simple as a glass of champagne or a little Prosecco can have an impact on your oral health and the appearance of your smile.

The team here at Smiles For Life would like to take a moment to consider the effects of champagne and sparkling wine on your teeth. The next time you visit our Harrisburg, VA office, we can address any damage done, but it's best you know ahead of time what bubbly can do to your smile.

Is Champagne Bad for Your Teeth?

It may come as a surprise, but champagne is a potential source of harm to your dental health. Much like soft drinks and other carbonated beverages, champagne can have a negative impact on the appearance and the health of your teeth.

Specifically, champagne can cause problems with the appearance of your smile and can also weaken the enamel of your teeth.

Champagne and Tooth Discoloration

While champagne is relatively light in color, it can lead to tooth discoloration over time. Much like tea or other beverages, the front teeth may wind you stained if you drink champagne regularly. Over time, the stains and discoloration can become more pronounced. You can bypass some of the discoloration by sipping champagne through a straw if you have to.

Champagne and Tooth Decay

Champagne tastes lovely and goes down easy. Part of that is due to the alcohol and the bubbles, sure, but a big component of the flavor is sugar. As you know, sugar is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. As you make that New Year's Eve countdown and have a glass of sparkling wine, keep in mind that you're ingesting some sugar with each sip, and that could cause problems if you're not practicing good oral hygiene.

Champagne and Acidity

The biggest danger that champagne poses to your teeth is increased oral acidity. The bubbles are the trouble. Champagne contains carbonic acid, which is the result of the carbonation process. This results in a more acidic oral pH. Over time, this can lead to acidic erosion, which softens and weakens the enamel of the teeth. If enamel erosion continues to occur, the enamel can wear away, leaving the underlying dentin of the teeth exposed.

Bottom Line: Be Careful with Bubbly

This holiday season, be sure to be careful with those glasses of champagne. Having a little bit of sparkling wine or Prosecco is fine, but practice moderation and avoid excessive drinking.

To prevent stains, decay, and erosion, be sure to rinse out your mouth with water after you've had a glass of champagne. If possible, brush your teeth about 30 minutes later. Waiting just a bit of time helps avoid accidentally damaging the tooth enamel after it's been exposed to an acidic substance. And again, consider a drinking straw to help minimize direct contact with your teeth.

Learn More About Diet and Dental Health

For more information about improving the health and appearance of your smile, be sure to contact an experienced cosmetic and restorative dentist. The team at Smiles For Life is here to help you experience improved dental health and wellness all year round.

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